look book

The Look Book Goes to a Rodeo at Madison Square Garden

The Professional Bull Riders’ Major circuit began with the three-day Monster Energy Buck Off.

Photo: Frankie Alduino
Photo: Frankie Alduino

John Crimber (pictured above)
Professional bull rider, Decatur, Texas

Didn’t I see you on the news the other night?
Yes.

You’re the 18-year-old rider everyone’s excited about.
Yes, ma’am.

How long have you been riding?
My whole life. I started with sheep and then when I was 6 years old I started riding bulls.

What’s the biggest event you’ve ever done?
This one. Madison Square Garden is the biggest one I’ve been to. Yes, ma’am.

And what do you most enjoy about it?
It’s an unexplainable feeling, that’s for dang sure.

Paulo Crimber

Professional bull-riding coach, Decatur, Texas

Felipe Furlan

Professional bull rider, Henrietta, Texas

Kody Lostroh

Professional bull-riding coach, Ault, Colorado


Who are you coaching?

A new team that’ll be based out of New York. Our home event will be in Brooklyn. This is all brand-new. You’re one of the few that knows what’s going on. We’re building our team from the ground up. So I’m here meeting some of the new people I haven’t met yet and talking to some of the riders.

Keyshawn Whitehorse

Professional bull rider, McCracken Spring, Utah


How did you get into this?

When I was about 5, I saw it on TV with my dad. All I said is “I want to do that.” The next day he bought me some boots, a cowboy hat, spurs, and a little rope, and I started from there. I grew up in Utah, so it made sense. It’s not like bull rider Bobby DelVecchio from the Bronx. A guy from the Bronx—everybody’s like, “What the heck’s wrong with you, man?”

Cody Kostraba

Crew member, Caledonia, New York

Lucas Divino

Professional bull rider, Decatur, Texas

Mike Miller

Stock contractor, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania

Saige Miller

Stock contractor, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania


So are you driving the bulls through midtown?

Yeah. It’s awful. I’ve been driving since probably 7 years old, or old enough that I could reach the pedals, but this is totally different. You’re driving in the city among people who don’t understand anything about driving a truck and trailer. But that’s not the worst part. The worst part is taking care of them in the cold.

Mauricio Moreira

Professional bull rider, Tremembé, Brazil

Blake Sharp

Stock contractor, Columbus, Mississippi

Ednei Caminhas

Professional bull rider, Anna, Texas

Josie Ogilbee

Stock contractor, Mount Orab, Ohio


What’s your least favorite part of the job?

Seeing a bull get hurt. It’s no different than a bull rider; it’s not if, it’s when. Some break a leg, some pull a muscle and need time off. We do our very best just to keep them healthy. They get exercise every day at home. They got a strict diet, just like a pro athlete. But it’s never a bad bull that gets hurt. It’s always the good ones.

Wingson Henrique da Silva

Professional bull rider, Bowie, Texas

Riley Page

Gateman and arena crew, Godley, Texas

Cooper Davis

Professional bull rider, Dallas, Texas

Herre Terpstra

Truck driver, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Tandy Freeman

Sports-medicine medical director, Dallas, Texas


You take care of the riders?

I’m an orthopedic surgeon, and I take care of things when they go wrong. This is my 30th season. I’ve had an athlete injured in the arena who then died at the hospital, and I’ve had two end up in wheelchairs. Was there something I could have done differently? No. The only way would be if he had not gotten on the bull.

Dawson Gleaves

Professional bull rider, Amarillo, Texas 

Photographs by Frankie Alduino

Paulo Crimber

Professional bull-riding coach, Decatur, Texas

Felipe Furlan

Professional bull rider, Henrietta, Texas

Kody Lostroh

Professional bull-riding coach, Ault, Colorado


Who are you coaching?

A new team that’ll be based out of New York. Our home event will be in Brooklyn. This is all brand-new. You’re one of the few that knows what’s going on. We’re building our team from the ground up. So I’m here meeting some of the new people I haven’t met yet and talking to some of the riders.

Keyshawn Whitehorse

Professional bull rider, McCracken Spring, Utah


How did you get into this?

When I was about 5, I saw it on TV with my dad. All I said is “I want to do that.” The next day he bought me some boots, a cowboy hat, spurs, and a little rope, and I started from there. I grew up in Utah, so it made sense. It’s not like bull rider Bobby DelVecchio from the Bronx. A guy from the Bronx—everybody’s like, “What the heck’s wrong with you, man?”

Cody Kostraba

Crew member, Caledonia, New York

Lucas Divino

Professional bull rider, Decatur, Texas

Mike Miller

Stock contractor, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania

Saige Miller

Stock contractor, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania


So are you driving the bulls through midtown?

Yeah. It’s awful. I’ve been driving since probably 7 years old, or old enough that I could reach the pedals, but this is totally different. You’re driving in the city among people who don’t understand anything about driving a truck and trailer. But that’s not the worst part. The worst part is taking care of them in the cold.

Mauricio Moreira

Professional bull rider, Tremembé, Brazil

Blake Sharp

Stock contractor, Columbus, Mississippi

Ednei Caminhas

Professional bull rider, Anna, Texas

Josie Ogilbee

Stock contractor, Mount Orab, Ohio


What’s your least favorite part of the job?

Seeing a bull get hurt. It’s no different than a bull rider; it’s not if, it’s when. Some break a leg, some pull a muscle and need time off. We do our very best just to keep them healthy. They get exercise every day at home. They got a strict diet, just like a pro athlete. But it’s never a bad bull that gets hurt. It’s always the good ones.

Wingson Henrique da Silva

Professional bull rider, Bowie, Texas

Riley Page

Gateman and arena crew, Godley, Texas

Cooper Davis

Professional bull rider, Dallas, Texas

Herre Terpstra

Truck driver, Indianapolis, Indiana 

Tandy Freeman

Sports-medicine medical director, Dallas, Texas


You take care of the riders?

I’m an orthopedic surgeon, and I take care of things when they go wrong. This is my 30th season. I’ve had an athlete injured in the arena who then died at the hospital, and I’ve had two end up in wheelchairs. Was there something I could have done differently? No. The only way would be if he had not gotten on the bull.

Dawson Gleaves

Professional bull rider, Amarillo, Texas 

Photographs by Frankie Alduino

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