All From:

Urbanism

  1. actually smart cities
    Jaime Lerner Made Your City BetterThe hugely influential urban planner died this week at 83.
  2. our climate
    What If New York Stopped Knocking Down Buildings?A vast amount of captured carbon would stay where it is.
  3. pedalling
    Here’s a Handsome Solution to New York’s Bike-Parking CrisisOonee’s pods can securely store seven bikes in one car’s worth of parking.
  4. street view
    Scott Stringer Has Big Ideas About Your StreetAnd your sidewalk, and your commute. A first look at his comprehensive transit plan.
  5. street view
    If Your City Were Really Dying, You Probably Wouldn’t KnowVisiting Annalee Newitz’s Four Lost Cities.
  6. street view
    Even Before COVID, Superstar Cities Were ShrinkingIn London, Paris, Tokyo, and New York, the population is steady or falling. But that doesn’t mean they’re in trouble.
  7. whirrrrrrr
    Los Angeles Wants a Flying-Taxi Division. What Could Go Wrong?Unlikely future, meet realistic present.
  8. streets
    Anatomy of a Streetery: Guevara’sIt’s Cuban-inspired and stands solidly on the corner of Clifton and Grand.
  9. city hall
    Corey Johnson Wants to Tame the Giant Squid of City PlanningThe squid may have other ideas, though.
  10. city people
    Now That an Urban Planner Is on the City Council, Can She Help Fix Los Angeles?Nithya Raman is calling for systemic change — including breaking up her own district.
  11. street view
    A Pandemic Winter Is Coming to New York, and It’s Going to Be Unimaginably HardDuring the last surge, New Yorkers could at least spend a lot of time outdoors.
  12. my city life
    I Waited So Long for This Target Store to Open That I Don’t Want It AnymoreIt took over a decade for L.A. to pave a strip mall and put up a parking lot.
  13. tax breaks
    The Most Notorious Property-Tax Underpayers in CaliforniaProposition 15, which would level the field, is a 50-50 shot to pass on Election Day.
  14. street view
    The Next Mayor’s Next CityBill de Blasio’s successor will get the chance to make New York life easier, nicer, and fairer — or just keep us going the way we were before.